The leaf and stem mines of British flies and other insects
 

(Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera)

by Brian Pitkin, Willem Ellis, Colin Plant and Rob Edmunds

Join us on Facebook

SATUREJA. Savoury. [Lamiaceae]


Two species of Satureja are recorded in Britain. Both are introduced.

Five British miners are recorded on Satureja.

A key to the European miners recorded on Satureja is provided in Bladmineerders van Europa.




Key for the identification of the known mines of British
insects (Diptera and non-Diptera) recorded on Satureja


1a >Stem-miner: A narrow, inconspicuous stem mine. Pupation at the end of the mine (Spencer, 1976: 64).

Fine, upper- or lower-surface corridor, ending in a thick vein. From there the mine extends finally to the rind of the stem. There also the pupation takes place, usually not far from the root collar. Mines in the stem rind often are conspicuous through a red discoloration (Bladmineerders van Europa).

On Achillea, Achillea millefolium and possibly Anthemis, Matricaria and Medicago sativa, but not yet on Satureja, in Britain. In Britain widespread in south, not uncommon. On Anthemis, Achillea, Artemisia, Aster, Centaurea, Clinopodium, Crepis, Hieracium, Matricaria, Reichardia, Solidago, Tanacetum, Tripleurospermum, Medicago, Satureja and Stachys elsewhere. Widespread in continental Europe.

Ophiomyia curvipalpis (Zetterstedt, 1848) [Diptera: Agromyzidae].

1b > Stem miner: A shallow, inconspicuous external stem mine. Pupation in stem near a node (Spencer, 1972b: 29).

On Clinopodium, Galeopsis, Lamium and Stachys, but not yet on Satureja, in Britain and Calamintha, Galeopsis, Lamium, Nepeta, Prunella, Satureja and Stachys elsewhere. Widespread in Britain including Surrey, Oxford, Hunts, Warwick, Suffolk and Perth. Widespread in continental Europe. Also recorded from the East Palaearctic.

Ophiomyia labiatarum Hering, 1937 [Diptera: Agromyzidae].

1c > Leaf-miner and case-bearer: Blotch mines reaching the edge of the leaf, initially pale green turning brownish white, are caused by the larva feeding on the underside of a leaf (UKMoths). The fully developed case is slender, shining black brown, about 9 mm long. Towards the end a narrow, transparent yellowish ventral keel. Mouth angle 50-60°. Cases on the leaf underside (Bladmineerders van Europa).

On Calamintha, Clinopodium, Glechoma, ? Lycopus, Mentha, Nepeta, Origanum, Prunella, Salvia, Stachys and Thymus, but not yet on Satureja, in Britain plus Melissa, Melittis and Satureja but not Calamintha elsewhere. Throughout England and Wales and a few places in Scotland. Widespread in continental Europe.

Coleophora albitarsella Zeller, 1849 [Lepidoptera: Coleophoridae].

1d > Leaf-miner: Young larvae make small, brown, full depth blotch mines without frass in the young leaves, from within the protection of a spinning. Later they cause upper-surface window feeding, while hidden among spun leaves (Bladmineerders van Europa).

On Thymus, but not yet on Satureja, in Britain and Mentha, Thymus and Satureja elsewhere. Widespread in Britain and continental Europe. Also recorded in Ireland.

Scrobipalpa artemisiella (Treitschke, 1833) [Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae].

1e > Leaf miner: Mine beginning with a small spiral, later developing into a greenish blotch, brown when old. Pupation frequently in mine (Spencer, 1972b: 90).

The mine, that may be upper- or lower-surface, generally starts with a tight spiral. Its loops are so tight that the leaf tissue dies off and turns red; nevertheless the corridor remains well visible. Later the corridor widens and finally a large secondary blotch develops around the initial spiral. Frass at first in two rows of grains, later in pearl chains. Feeding lines very clear. Pupation now within, then outside the mine (Bladmineerders van Europa).

On Clinopodium, Mentha and Nepeta, but not yet on Satureja, in Britain and Clinopodium and Satureja elsewhere. Doubtfully recorded from Oxford in Britain. Widespread in continental Europe.

Phytomyza obscura Hendel, 1920 [Diptera: Agromyzidae].



XHTML Validator Last updated 29-Jan-2018  Brian Pitkin Top of page